45th Writing Awards – November 30 Deadline

by NMW

Michele Leavitt’s “Hidden in a Suitcase” (NMW 2017)

Michele Leavitt’s “Hidden in a Suitcase” (NMW 2017)

Michele Leavitt of Gainesville, FL has won the 43rd New Millennium Nonfiction Prize for “Hidden in a Suitcase.”

She will receive $1,000 and publication both online and in print.

“On reunion and loss, on being back in the fold and being caught in the web, on free will and the things we cannot change. One woman’s story about finding the family she never had and the heartbreak that can come from having so many people to love.”

Award-Winning Writing Advice: Miah Jeffra

Award-Winning Writing Advice: Miah Jeffra

Winner of the 43rd New Millennium Flash Fiction Prize

“Writing is a studio practice. And, much like any studio practice, there is no single way to establish that practice. There has been a lot written on the how-to. Some say write every day, for one hour. Some say schedule your writing time, like any other occupation. I say listen to

Miah Jeffra

Miah Jeffra

Winner of the 43rd Writing Contest for Flash Fiction (2017)

Miah Jeffra of San Francisco, CA has won the New Millennium Flash Fiction Prize for “Growl.”

Miah will receive $1,000, a certificate to mark the success, and publication both online and in print.

Miah’s story, ‘Growl,’ pays homage to that most primal noise. It is a reminder that inside all of us lives an animal, and in the moments our passions are most inflamed — by anger, by hunger, by lust — the animal must be heard.

READ “GROWL” (coming soon)

Miah JeffraMiah Jeffra is the author of The First Church of What’s Happening (forthcoming, Nomadic Press, Fall 2017), and has been awarded the Sidney Lanier Prize and Clark-Gross Award for fiction, and a 2014 Lambda Literary Fellowship for nonfiction. Jeffra is Editor of queer literary collaborative, Foglifter Press.

Read Miah’s advice on writing here.

Michele Leavitt

Michele Leavitt

Winner of the 43rd Writing Contest for Nonfiction

Michele Leavitt of Gainesville, FL has won the New Millennium Nonfiction Prize for “Hidden in a Suitcase.”

She will receive $1,000, a certificate to document the success, and publication both online and in print.

“On reunion and loss, on being back in the fold and being caught in the web, on free will and the things we cannot change. One woman’s story about finding the family she never had and the heartbreak that can come from having so many people to love.”

READ “HIDDEN IN A SUITCASE”

Michele LeavittMichele Leavitt, a high school dropout, hepatitis C survivor, and former trial attorney, writes poetry and nonfiction. Her essays appear most recently in Guernica, Sycamore Review, Grist, Hippocampus and Catapult. She’s the author of the Kindle Singles memoir, Walk Away.

Michele shares her advice on writing here.

Learn more on her website and connect with her on Twitter.

Cassady Black

Cassady Black

Winner of the 43rd Writing Contest for Fiction

Cassady Black of Denver, Colorado has won the New Millennium Fiction Prize for “Mapping Hana.”

She will receive $1,000, a certificate to document the success, and publication both online and in print.

“A haunting and enchanting mystery. From the startling first lines to each smoldering revelation, readers will be delightfully lured into this map of a marriage whose true north has vanished in the night.”

READ “MAPPING HANA”

Cassady BlackCassady Black lives in Colorado, where she is a writer, editor, and consultant. She is a founding editor of “Slow Trains Literary Journal,” and her writing has been published in “Eclectica,” “Salon.com,” and “The Best American Erotica” series, among others.

Links: cassadyblack.com and slowtrains.com

 

*Editor’s Note: This story was first published under the name “Mapping Charlotte” in the online journal, Eclectica Magazine, under the author’s previous pen name.

Katie Bickham

Katie Bickham

Katie Bichkham

Katie Bickham of Shreveport, LA has won the 43rd New Millennium Poetry Prize for “Shorn.” She will receive $1,000 and publication both online and in print.

Katie’s book, The Belle Mar(2015), won the Lena-Miles Wever Todd Poetry Prize. Katie’s poems have appeared in Rattle, Southern Quarterly, Prairie Schooner, Pleiades, The Missouri Review, and elsewhere. She received The Missouri Review Editor’s Prize and an SLS fellowship.

Katie teaches creative writing at Bossier Parish Community College.

“Equal parts ode and lament, “Shorn” explores the power of women’s hair, its ubiquitous influence on art and society, and the awe, fear, and possessiveness it too often inspires in others. An evocative and compelling work.” –NMW

READ “SHORN” HERE

Kerry Tepperman Campbell’s “Bougainvillea” (NMW 2016)

Kerry Tepperman Campbell’s “Bougainvillea” (NMW 2016)

Kerry Tepperman Campbell of San Anselmo, CA has won the 42nd New Millennium Poetry Prize for “Bougainvillea.”

She will receive $1,000 and publication both online and in print.

“Our Editor Emeritus, Don Williams, was moved nearly to tears the first time he read this fine poem. Its lines evoke the lushness and possibility of youth and remind the reader that eventually the garden within each of us must return to the earth.” –NMW

Elizabeth Amon’s “Hair of the Dog” (NMW 2016)

Elizabeth Amon’s “Hair of the Dog” (NMW 2016)

–This award is Elizabeth’s first literary prize for fiction.–


Elizabeth Amon of Seattle, Washington has won the 42nd New Millennium Fiction Prize for “Hair of the Dog.”

She will receive $1,000 and publication both online and in print.

“Each time I read Amon’s story, the lines of a favorite Paul Simon song, ‘Slip Slidin’ Away,’ ran through my head. For anyone who worries that the best parts of life have gotten away from you, this story is here to remind us that sometimes we let things escape because otherwise they would have consumed us whole.”–NMW

William Polsgrove’s “Highway 61” (NMW 2016)

William Polsgrove’s “Highway 61” (NMW 2016)

–This award is William’s first literary prize and his first published story.–


William Polsgrove of Frederick, Maryland has won the 42nd New Millennium Flash Fiction Prize for “Highway 61.”

He will receive $1,000 and publication both online and in print.

“Polsgrove’s story captures perfectly the angst of growing up in a place you can’t belong, a town where the best things in your life are the ones you can’t tell anyone about, and where you make your escape every chance you get.”