45th Writing Awards – November 30 Deadline

Archives: nonfiction award

Michele Leavitt’s “Hidden in a Suitcase” (NMW 2017)

Michele Leavitt’s “Hidden in a Suitcase” (NMW 2017)

Michele Leavitt of Gainesville, FL has won the 43rd New Millennium Nonfiction Prize for “Hidden in a Suitcase.”

She will receive $1,000 and publication both online and in print.

“On reunion and loss, on being back in the fold and being caught in the web, on free will and the things we cannot change. One woman’s story about finding the family she never had and the heartbreak that can come from having so many people to love.”

Kirk Wilson’s “A Brief and Necessary Madness” (NMW 2016)

Kirk Wilson’s “A Brief and Necessary Madness” (NMW 2016)

Kirk Wilson of Austin, Texas has won the 42rd New Millennium Nonfiction Prize for “A Brief and Necessary Madness.”

He will receive $1,000 and publication both online and in print.

“A murderous sheriff, an indigent ex-baseball star, and a lone boy trying to make sense of the madness his town has grown accustomed to. In his stirring recollection of small-town Texas, our Nonfiction Winner’s empathetic portrayal brings each character to life and his lyrical prose makes the essay sing.” –NMW

Carol Marsh’s “Pictures in Leaves” (NMW 2016)

Carol Marsh’s “Pictures in Leaves” (NMW 2016)

Carol Marsh of Washington D.C. has won the 41st New Millennium Nonfiction Prize for “Pictures in Leaves.”

She will receive $1,000 and publication both online and in print.

“For anyone who’s ever shouted across the dinner table, debating with a loved one about war, dissent, and the true meaning of patriotism, Marsh’s essay will resonate deeply.” –NMW

Maria Caruso’s “The Vacationers” (NMW 2004)

Maria Caruso has won the 15th New Millennium Nonfiction Prize for “The Vacationers.”

She will receive $1,000 and publication both online and in print.

A Note from the Author:

“I’ve shifted Eleanor Roosevelt’s idea about life, ‘The thing you think cannot do is the thing you must do,’ and applied it to my writing. I try to write about the things I think I can’t bear to write about.”

—Maria Caruso